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THE GOODWOOD REVIVAL 2006

Text and photos courtesy of Enrico Pederzolli.

This is one event that I always look forward to. The superb cars and unique atmosphere have made it one of the most anticipated classic motor sport events on the classic motor racing calendar. Over 110,000 visitors made their way to West Sussex this year and, like me, would not have been disappointed!!


Maseratis at The Goodwood Revival

A Fifties garage scene


Maseratis in the Goodwood paddock area

Mechanics prepare a 250F for practice
 
THERE WAS A FIAT 1500 4-DOOR SALOON (1934-1939)!!
 

 

 
 
AND WHAT'S THIS???


1934 Maserati Tipo 8CM #3020 - "Are you looking for the other Maseratis?"
 
This year's event provided the motor racing enthusiast with a wonderful collection of classic machines, among them was ample entertainment for the Maserati 'aficionado'. Unfortunately I couldn't stay for the racing, but I did manage some excellent photographs of the Maseratis while they were being prepared in the paddock.

The Maseratis entered for the 'Goodwood Trophy', for Grand Prix and Formula Libre cars of a type that raced between 1930 and 1950, included, two 1932 Tipo 4CMs, one 1934 Tipo 6C-34, three 1934 Tipo 8CMs, two 1937 Tipo 6CMs and a 1939 Tipo 4CL.

Entered for the 'Richmond Trophy', for front-engined Formula One cars that raced between 1948 and 1959, were five Tipo 250Fs, of which I only managed to photograph three, two Tipo A6GCMs, and the Tec-Mec 250F (which I able to photograph back at the 2002 Goodwood Revival).

Three Maserati Tipo 300S' and two Tipo 61 'Birdcage' (I only saw one) took part in the 'Sussex Trophy', a race for World Championship cars and production sports-racing cars of a type that raced between 1955 and 1960.
 
THE MASERATIS
 

1951 Maserati A6GCM - #2033

 

 
 

 
 

 

1953 Maserati A6GCM - #2504

 
 

 

 

 
 

1959 Maserati Tipo 61 'Birdcage' #2453

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

 

 
 

1956 Maserati Tipo 250F #2521

 

 
 

1956 Maserati Tipo 250F #25??

 

 
 

 

 

 
 

1956 Maserati Tipo 250F #2518

 

Maserati 300Ss in the paddock
 

1955 Maserati Tipo 300S #3051

1956 Maserati Tipo 300S #3060

1955 Maserati Tipo 300S #30??
 

Rev counter of Maserati Tipo 300S #30??

1955 Maserati Tipo A6GCS #2098

 
 

1955 Maserati Tipo A6GCS #2093

 
 
This year's event saw a splendid gathering of pre-1940 racing Maseratis ranging from a 1932 4CM to a 1939 4CL.

The Tipo 4CM

Following the development of the 4C (or 4CTR) and its appearance at Monza, Alfieri recognised that the car was better suited to road racing, so the development of the 4CM proceeded using the same mechanicals, but a new single-seat frame and the hydraulic braking system that had been employed on the 8C Trazione Anteriore (front wheel drive). In 1932 and 1933 the 1100 cc car did well against all competitors until from 1934 it was often outpaced by its 1500 cc rivals. Nonetheless Maserati continued to develop the series until at the end of their development with a fixed head the magic 100 hp per litre of displacement had been surpassed. In 1936 the Tipo 4CM 1100 developed by Furmanik and owned by Rovere, using a special body, was used to set a world record for its class and the outstanding power of 143 hp/litre was obtained - never having been achieved before in an automobile engine. The last car built for Lurani in 1937 had by then progressed to the latest generation chassis with independent front wheels and similar in appearance to the 6CM.

The Tipo 4CL

The 4CL ('L' for in line or "Linguette") was conceived by Ernesto Maserati in the beginning of 1937 as necessary to combat the Alfa 158. Ready for testing in January 1939, the 4CL had a new 'square' engine with equal bore and stroke (78x78mm) but with 4 valves per cylinder to generate the required horsepower and retain the versatility of the engine. Fitted into a frame almost the same as the 6CM the car met with success. After the war it continued to be the pacesetter and only began to wane when the Alfa's took up two-stage supercharging, which Maserati did not adopt officially until 1947. In the interim Ernesto was trying to resolve a torsional problem with the frame and began experimenting with tubular frames, which led to the 4CLT.

The Tipo 8CM

The definitive version of the 3000 cc Grand Prix car and replacement for the 8C 2800 and 8C 3000 was the Tipo 8CM. Utilising the engine from the 8C 3000 and the frame concept and suspension system developed for the 4CM 1100 these developments came together in the single seater - the 8CM. Until the arrival of Nuvolari in 1933 the front end of the car was stiffened by enclosing the long members of the frame in sleeves to create a box like structure. A change in the regulations requiring a larger frame (820 mm vs the 620 mm of the 4CM type frame used) which required transverse stiffening, so the body work at the front was extended to envelope the front of the frame. Most 8CM's were sold to private customers and many customer variations were made around the basic design the most notable being Whitney Straight. Two sports versions were developed; one by Taruffi and a more elegant version by Straight which was used daily in London traffic! Maserati improvements included: in 1934 engine power was increased through improved carburettion; in 1935 independent front suspension and in 1936 on a single customer car a new cylinder head, pistons and valves which lifted output to 312 bhp (104 hp/litre) and constituted a preview of the Tipo 8CTF which was to come.

The Tipo 8C-34

The new international formula in 1934 was limited to vehicles with 750 kg which suited the 8CM but against the financial might of the Germans was not felt to be competitive. The search for more horsepower and reduced weight led to the 6C/34, which adopted the same bore and stroke dimensions as the 2500cc Tipo 4C 2500. Using the new production method developed for the 2500 cc with fixed cylinder head and the cylinder blocks used in groups of two, mounted on a single elektron crankcase produced a 3724 cc in-line six cylinder motor which gave 30 bhp more than the 8CM and reduced weight. The first engine was mounted on the 8CM frame (no 3012) of Nuvolari making its debut in the GP of Italy in 1934. In 1935 it was given independent front suspension via torsion bars, but nonetheless was seen as an interim car waiting on the arrival of the V8RI.

The Tipo 6CM

With pressure from the ERA, the 4CM 1500 whilst still competitive prompted Ernesto to take the step of building the 6CM 1500 which incorporated all the innovations present in both the V8RI and the 4CM. The new car which appeared in 1936 had the conventional frame from the 4CM and rigid rear axle, but the independent front suspension from the V8RI and the in-line 6 cylinder motor used the design of the cylinders cast in block with the head and mounted in pairs on the crankcase. After proving more than a match for the ERA, the 6CM was radically modified in 1938 with a more powerful engine, new semi-cantilever rear leaf springs, the lowering of the frame and the placement of fairings over the suspension on the side of the car to improve aerodynamics. Then in 1939, a thirdversion with changes to a taller radiator or grille cowling. At this time, which was during the construction of the 4CL and in the declining period of the 6CM, a four valve per cylinder motor (24 valve) was used in the last two cars made, but with little success in its initial outings. By 1940 experiments had begun with a naturally aspirated version of the 6CM which would lead eventually in 1946 to the 6CS/46 and the A6.

POST-1950

The Tipo A6GCM

After the decline in the 4CLT/48 entry into Formula 1, which had become a confrontation between Alfa Romeo and Ferrari would have been uneconomic. Maserati instead focused on Formula 2 in which the A6GCS had also run. Two new cars were built initially - each A6GCM utilised a dual overhead camshaft, single ignition engine with 160 bhp, derived from the A6GCS and on a chassis similar to the 4CLT/48. Constructed but not utilised, these cars were sold to the Bandereintes team. In 1952 a transitional car appeared with a square engine75x75 mm, dual ignition and an increase of power to 180 bhp, but the car had fundamental problems with the chassis. In 1953 under the guidance of Giachino Columbo there was a total revision, the engine was given new dimensions 76.2x72mm and a torsion resistant chassis using a trellis structure. Concerns about the rear axle were resolved by anchoring it to to the frame with an integrating triangle of reaction bars and seven-leaf semi-cantilevered leaf springs. Larger new front brakes with deep radial fins were added. A more elliptic shape for the front cowling and with other minor body variations its saw its first event at Naples in 1953. Designated by some as the A6SSG it was in fact the definitive AGCM which laid the framework for the 250F which would follow.
 
THE RACING MASERATIS OF THE THIRTIES
 

1934 Maserati Tipo 8CM - #3013

 
 

 

 
 

 

 
 

1937 Maserati Tipo 6CM #1547

 
 

 

 
 

 

 

 
 

 

 
 

1932 Maserati Tipo 4CM 1100 #1119

 
 

 

 
 

 

 

 
 

 

 
 

1934 Maserati Tipo 8CM #3009

1939 Maserati Tipo 4CL #1566
 
1934 Maserati Tipo 8CM #3009
1934 Maserati Tipo 8CM #3009

1934 Maserati Tipo 8CM #3009
 

1934 Maserati Tipo 8CM #3009

1934 Maserati Tipo 8CM #3020
 

1934 Maserati Tipo 8CM #3009

1934 Maserati Tipo 6C-34 #3023
 

1934 Maserati Tipo 6C-34 #3023

1934 Maserati Tipo 6C-34 #3023
 

1934 Maserati Tipo 6C-34 #3023

1934 Maserati Tipo 8CM #3020

1934 Maserati Tipo 6C-34 #3023
 

1934 Maserati Tipo 6C-34 #3023

1934 Maserati Tipo 6C-34 #3023
 

1934 Maserati Tipo 6C-34 #3023

1934 Maserati Tipo 6C-34 #3023
 

1937 Maserati Tipo 6CM #1513

1937 Maserati Tipo 6CM #1513
 

1939 Maserati Tipo 4CL #1566

1939 Maserati Tipo 4CL #1566
 

1934 Maserati Tipo 8CM #3020

The pre-1940 Maserati paddock

1934 Maserati Tipo 6C-34 #3023
 

1937 Maserati Tipo 6CM #1513

1937 Maserati Tipo 6CM #1513

1932 Maserati Tipo 4CM 1100 #1119
 

1953 Maserati Tipo A6GCM

1934 Maserati Tipo 8CM #3009

1951 Maserati Tipo A6GCM
 
....ROLL ON THE GOODWOOD REVIVAL 2007!! BE SURE NOT TO MISS IT!!

PLEASE REMEMBER TO BOOK IN ADVANCE, ADMISSION IS BY TICKET ONLY!


THE GOODWOOD REVIVAL 2006

Text by Smiffy and photos courtesy of Dave Smith and David Williamson.

Made an early start on Friday and planned an interesting "non-motorway" route for the 430. Driving through the rolling Sussex Downs with the morning sun glinting through clouds on to the trees - anyway enough of that, back to the Revival.

Much thought put into my "period gear", but I'm afraid I stayed with my checked jacket and peaked cap, much like 73% of the rest of the chaps. There seemed to be a very large crowd for Friday and more people seemed to be in period gear than last year, which makes it much more fun.

Photo by Dave Smith

Stefan Shollwoeck (6CM #1547) and Mark Gillies (4CL #1566)
Photo by Dave Smith

Julia de Baldanza (A6GCM #2033) and Barrie Baxter (Tec-Mec 250F)

It's easy to see the popularity of the Revival, apart from the dressing up, with people constantly saying "I had one of those" or "my Dad had the 350cc model", great reminiscing. Both inside and outside of the circuit were fine examples of the "long gone" British car and motorcycle industry and even I muttered; "I had one of those but it was light blue".

The day started off very much "cap-on, cap-off" weather with a sunny afternoon but clouding over at 17.00ish, what a difference from last years fine weather. American-bred music was much in evidence with Rock and Roll and the Big Band Sound coming from various parts of the circuit. I got a bit of a shock at midday watching a jazz/rock group, as the sun came out a lot of people starting jiving (perhaps I should learn for next year!)

Photo by Dave Smith

Sean Danaher (8CM #3009) and Josef Rettenmaier (6C-34 #3023)
Photo by Dave Smith

4CM (#2011) made 240,000 at the Bonhams Goodwood Sale

It was practise day today but both Dario Franchitti and Adrian Newey had nasty accidents in lightweight E-types on the newly resurfaced track. Thankfully neither was injured but it proves the circuit is no great respecter of reputations and has to be treated with care. The only club member I saw today was Edwin Faulkner who had with minimal help erected the Manx Motor Club stand. He was obviously getting some practise in for the Maserati Club stand at the Classic Motor Show in October (volunteer to help now!) Edwin also told me his beautiful Quattroporte 1 was on display outside Goodwood House, sharing the limelight with a QP 5. My award for the most outlandish "period gear" went to a chap dressed up as Sherlock Holmes, in blue tartan!! Could it be our esteemed Chairman? Just as I had thought my blood pressure had survived the day, I saw the Air Hostesses again!!

Photo by David Williamson

Maserati 6CM (#1513)
Photo by David Williamson

Maseratis in the paddock

Paddock patrol - on show a mouth watering display of Maseratis - A6GCM x 2, 4CL x 1, 8CM x 3, 6C-34 x 1, 6CM x 2, 4CM x 1, 250F x 4, TEC-MEC x 1, A6GCS x 2, Tipo 61 x 1 and 300S x 4. There were also 3 very pretty little OSCAs entered for the Formula junior race. It was also great to see club member Roger Earl in his OSCA MT4 taking part in the daily tribute to Phil Hill parade.

Saturday - instead of Spitfires and sunshine it was rain and a Mustang as I drove into the circuit this morning. What a strange lot we English are, all joining in to a record of "Keep on running" by Spencer Davis as we passed the Capital Gold Radio Bus.

Forget about the weather, first race of the day was the Goodwood Trophy, for GP and Formula Libre cars raced between 1930 and 1950, where a 6CM and 4CL headed four ERAs on the grid. What a result with Stefan Schollwoeck first in his 6CM, Mark Gilles second in a 4CL and Julian Majzub third in his Alfa 3080. Wonderful sight of positions 15 to 19 being filled by 6C-34, two 8CMs, 4CM and 8CM. Great result on a damp track.

Photo by David Williamson

Julia de Baldanza in her A6GCM (#2033)
Photo by David Williamson

The Gigi Baulino 250F (#2518)

Another exciting race was part 1 of the St. Mary's trophy for 1950 - 1959 saloon cars. On a wet track it was a real David and Goliath struggle with Tony Jardine, A35, first scrapping with John Fitzpatrick, Austin A105, and then Derek Bell, Jaguar Mk 1. The result eventually was Jaguar, A35 and A105.

The weather really took a turn for the worse today, it was "never mind the tank top, get the wax jacket." Met Sarah and Roger Lucas who, like me, were still buoyed at the Maserati 1-2 in the first race. Also met Bill Jackson in the afternoon, looking as damp as me but enjoying the meeting anyway. Sorry to keep harping (!!!) back to the music but they were jiving in the rain today, never a dull moment at the Revival! The last race of the day was the Freddie March Memorial Trophy with Lukas Huni and Burkhard von Schenk bringing those wonderful A6GCS's home eighth and tenth respectively. Sunday - day started windy and showery, fingers crossed it will brighten up.

Photo by David Williamson

Michael Gans in 4CM (#1119)
Photo by David Williamson

Burkhard von Schenk in 250F (#2521)

The Richmond Trophy was for front engined Formula 1 cars raced between 1948 and 1959, entered were TEC-MEC, four 250Fs and two A6GCMs. The BRM type 25 and Ferrari 246 Dinos had the legs of the 250Fs in this race. Barrie Williams also took advantage of the damp conditions and came home third in the unique 4-wheel drive Ferguson. Barrie Baxter was the highest placed Maserati Man coming home fifth in his TEC--MEC after an exciting dice with Tony Smith, Ferrari 246 Dino, who finished fourth. Burkhard von Schenk was going really well in his 250F until he spun out on lap 2.

About midday the sun came out and it was great to see about a dozen Spitfires flying, celebrating the 70th Anniversary of this marvellous fighter plane.

Held in the sun, the Sussex Trophy was for World Championship sports cars of a type that raced between 1955 and 1960. Maserati interest here was Alan Minshaw in his Tipo 61 'Birdcage' plus four 300S Maseratis. One of the many great races of the weekend, Jean-Marc Gounon started from the back of the grid and scythed his way through the pack for a well deserved second place in an Aston Martin DBR2 behind winner Gary Pearson in a D-Type Jaguar long nose. Highest Maserati placings were seventh, Alan Minshaw T61, eleventh, Mark Gillies 300S and twelfth, Andrea Burani 300S.

Photo by David Williamson

Who's a naughty boy then?
Photo by David Williamson

Yes, you did mention Glamcabs!!

So once again a well organised event with something for everyone. By the way, did I mention Glamcabs?

Photo by David Williamson

This Maserati 3500 GTI is a "one-off" factory special made for Lippe.
Photo by David Williamson

David Williamson and friends!



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