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Maserati Engines         


The following images and text first appeared in the Summer 1997 issue of Il Tridente - La Rivista della Maserati.

All photographs remain the copyright of Maserati SpA.



TIPO 26

Production run: 1926-1932
Cylinders: 8 in line
Displacement: 1492cc
Bore and stroke: 60 mm x 66 mm
Valves: 2 per cylinder
Power: 120bhp at 5300rpm
Compression ratio: 5.8:1
Fuel supply with Roots supercharger




This is the first Maserati engine designed and built by Alfieri Maserati in 1926. Alfieri himself first raced the Tipo 26 car and won its class at the 1926 Targa Florio beating the strong Bugatti team.

During the years the engine was updated and evolved as Tipo 26B (1,980cc - 155bhp), 26MM (1,492cc - 128bbp), 26R (1,690cc - 140bhp), 26C (1,078cc - 95/105bhp) and 26M (2,495cc - 185bhp).




TIPO 6 CM

Production run: 1936-1939
Cylinders: 6 in line
Displacement: 1493cc
Bore and stroke: 65 mm x 75 mm
Valves: 2 per cylinder
Power: 155 - 175bhp at 6200 - 6600rpm
Compression ratio: 6.0:1
Fuel supply with Roots supercharger




This engine is a real masterpiece: the cylinder castings are integral with their heads, paired two by two on a common elektron crankcase; also the undercasing and the oil sump are in elektron. It was fitted to the streamlined 6 CM single-seater, able to run up to 230 kph, which dominated European races of the "Voiturette" formula (maximum displacement 1,500cc) between 1936 and 1939, winning the Targa Florio three times.




TIPO 4CL (dismantleable crankshaft)

Production run: 1939-1947
Cylinders: 4 in line
Displacement: 1490cc
Bore and stroke: 78 mm x 78 mm
Valves: 4 per cylinder
Power: 220bhp at 8000rpm
Compression ratio: 6.5:1
Fuel supply with Roots supercharger




This dismantleable crankshaft is a further proof of the technical excellence achieved by Maserati in the design and manufacture of engines. The company did not skimp on resources to attain the maximum competitiveness in racing. Designed in late 1946 it was built in a few units and experimentally fitted to the 4 CL single-seater. It was the last of Ernesto Maserati's designs before he left the 'Casa del Tridente'.




TIPO 8 CL

Production run: 1940-1946
Cylinders: 8 in line
Displacement: 2981cc
Bore and stroke: 78 mm x 78 mm
Valves: 4 per cylinder
Power: 415-430bhp at 6400-6800rpm
Compression ratio: 6.5:1
Fuel supply with twin Roots superchargers




Designed between 1939 and 1940, it's the obvious evolution of the 8 CTF engine which in those same years (1939 and 1940) won the Indianapolis 500, the most famous race in the world. With four valves per cylinder and square internal dimensions of 78mm x 78 mm, this modern supercharged engine was cut off in its prime by the outbreak of WWII. On resumption, the GP formula was changed and the 8 CL engine, no longer usable in the European races, was raced at Indy by Gigi Villoresi in 1946 and by the American Fred Agabasbian in 1949.




TIPO A6

Production run: 1946-1950
Cylinders: 6 in line
Displacement: 1488cc
Bore and stroke: 66 mm x 72.5 mm
Valves: 2 per cylinder
Power: 65bhp at 4700rpm
Compression ratio: 7.25:1
Fuel supply with Weber 36DCR carburettor




The first Maserati engine built for a modern gran turismo car and not for racing. Designed in 1941 but developed after WWII, this straight-6 single overhead camshaft engine was fitted to the A6 car designed by Pinin Farina. The car had a maximum speed of 150 kmh and 61 examples were built.




TIPO 4CF2

Production run: 1940-1946
Cylinders: 4 in line
Displacement: 1995cc
Bore and stroke: 88 mm x 82 mm
Valves: 4 per cylinder
Power: 182bhp at 7000rpm
Compression ratio: 12:1
Fuel supply by direct fuel injection




This is the prototype of an engine designed as alternative to the 6 cylinder A6GCM engine for the 2-litre Formula 2. It was a really modern design (it also had the dismantleable crankshaft) but was abandoned for the preferred solution of the 6-cylinder engine. It remains in its 1955 experimental state, when Maserati tested the direct fuel injection system (as did Mercedes during the same period).




TIPO 250 F1

Production run: 1954-1958
Cylinders: 6 in line
Displacement: 2493cc
Bore and stroke: 84 mm x 75 mm
Valves: 2 per cylinder
Power: 240-270bhp at 7200-8000rpm
Compression ratio: 12:1
Fuel supply with three Weber 42DCO3 carburettors




With this engine, fitted to the 250 F single-seater, Juan Manuel Fangio won the 1954 and 1957 F1 World Championships. The 250 F single-seater had a very long race career and took part in all F1 World Championship official races from January 1954 to November 1960, when the new formula introduced a displacement restriction of up to 1½-litre.

At the 1957 German GP on the mythical Nürburgring circuit, the great Argentinian Champion and the Modenese firm wrote one of the legendary pages in racing history with a 250 F single-seater. In 1956, direct fuel injection system was experimented with on this engine.




TIPO 3500 GT carburettor

Production run: 1957-1964
Cylinders: 6 in line
Displacement: 3485cc
Bore and stroke: 86 mm x 100 mm
Valves: 2 per cylinder
Power: 220bhp at 5500rpm
Compression ratio: 8.5:1
Fuel supply with three Weber 42DCOE carburettors




Designed in 1957 this engine took advantage of all the Maserati factory experiences on the straight-6 engines for F1 and Sports races: so it was very advanced both for its structural technics and for the materials used. It was the bearing base for all the Maserati gran turismo car production from 1957 to the late Sixties, and was fitted to the Touring, Sebring and Vignale Spider 3500s.




TIPO 3500 GT fuel injection

Production run: 1961-1964
Cylinders: 6 in line
Displacement: 3485cc
Bore and stroke: 86 mm x 100 mm
Valves: 2 per cylinder
Power: 235bhp at 5800rpm
Compression ratio: 8.5:1
Fuel supply by Lucas indirect fuel injection system




Today the indirect fuel injection system is one of the tecbnical specifications for a modern car, both to improve efficiency and to observe the anti-pollution regulations. In 1961 Maserati was the first Italian car manufacturer to adopt this system in production, exploiting its experiences from race cars on wbicb the indirect fuel injection had already been used in 1956, after the 1955 experimentations on the direct fuel injection system. Originally offered as an option, the indirect fuel injection was adopted in production on all the 6-cylinder engined cars from 1964.




TIPO 5000 GT fuel injection

Production run: 1960-1964
Cylinders: V8 @ 90°
Displacement: 4941cc
Bore and stroke: 94 mm x 89 mm
Valves: 2 per cylinder
Power: 340bhp at 5800rpm
Compression ratio: 8.5:1
Fuel supply by Lucas fuel injection




Derived from the 90° V-8 four overhead camshaft engine of the 1956/57 450S (the most powerful sports car ever built by Maserati), this engine was originally fitted with four Weber 45IDM carburettors and from 1960 also with the indirect fuel injection, from that time one of the pecularities of all the Maserati production cars. After the official retirement from racing at the end of the 1957 season, Maserati received a particular order from the Shah of Iran for a "civilized" version of the 450S race car: the 5000 GT, the fastest road car in the world, was born and only 33 examples were built for the international jet set.




TIPO 6400 motor-boat

Production run: 1962-1965
Cylinders: V8 @ 90°
Displacement: 6458cc
Bore and stroke: 110 mm x 85 mm
Valves: 2 per cylinder
Power: 580bhp at 6000rpm
Compression ratio: 10.6:1
Fuel supply with four Weber 48IDM carburettors




The V-8 engine, designed for the 450S sports car, was fitted also to the KD 800 kg and KD 900 kg inboard race boats, the most prestigious speedboat class at that time. The engine displacement was enlarged to 5,600cc and finally to 6,400cc and Maserati won with the drivers Lino Spagnoli, Flavio, Giorgio, and Liborio Guidotti, Ermanno Marchisio and Gian Luigi Crivelli eleven consecutive world titles from 1959 to 1969, strengthening the image of power and reliability of its products.




TIPO 8/F1

Production run: 1963
Cylinders: V12 @ 60°
Displacement: 1493cc
Bore and stroke: 55.2 mm x 52 mm
Valves: 2 per cylinder
Power: 200bhp at 12000rpm
Compression ratio: 12:1
Fuel supply by Lucas fuel injection




This experimental engine was designed and built in 1963 and developed in 1964 to run in the F1 World Championship reserved for the 1½-litre single-seater. The 60° V-12 engine with a six-speed gearbox/differential unit built into the crankcase was designed to be mounted in a transverse rear position, a really unusual and new design for those times. As for the 1966 GP season the new 3-litre formula was introduced, the project was abandoned but this Maserati technical choice was adopted by Honda for its F1 car and by Lamborghini for its Miura.




TIPO 9

Production run: 1966
Cylinders: V12 @ 60°
Displacement: 2989cc
Bore and stroke: 70.4 mm x 64 mm
Valves: 2 per cylinder
Power: 360bhp at 9000rpm
Compression ratio: 12:1
Fuel supply by Lucas fuel injection




Tbe first Maserati V-12 engine was designed in 1956 for the 350 S sports car and the 250 F single-seater. Unfortunately Maserati retired from racing at the end of the triumphal 1957 season and the V-12 engine was not further developed. Ten years later, the same engine, fitted with fuel injection, was used by the Cooper-Maserati F1 team and won two GPs in 1966 and 1967 seasons achieving second and third places in the 1966 F1 Championship with John Surtees and Jochen Rindt.




TIPO C114 fuel injection

Production run: 1972-1975
Cylinders: V6 @ 90°
Displacement: 2675cc
Bore and stroke: 87 mm x 75 mm
Valves: 2 per cylinder
Power: 188bhp at 6250rpm
Compression ratio: 9:1
Fuel supply by Bosch fuel injection




This is the evolution of the original carburettor engine designed for the Citroen SM, and was fitted to the second series of this fascinating model for the European market. The pecularities of this engine family were the utmost compactness and the remarkable lightness: the all alloy engine weighed no more than 140 kg and bad higher specifications in terms of specific power, power/weight ratio, acceleration, rpm and an exciting exhaust sound.




TIPO C114.50.30

Production run: 1972-1975
Cylinders: V6 @ 90°
Displacement: 2965cc
Bore and stroke: 91.6 mm x 75 mm
Valves: 2 per cylinder
Power: 190bhp at 6000rpm
Compression ratio: 9:1
Fuel supply with three Weber 44DCNF carburettors




Derived from the engine designed in 1968 for the unconventional Citroen SM, this engine was fitted to the Merak, the younger sister of the Bora. Built for the Merak, Merak SS and Merak 2000 (only for the Italian market), this engine was an important sales success for the Modenese firm.




ENGINE BITURBO AM 452.09

Production run: 1981-1992
V6-cyl @ 90° 1996.2 cc engine
DOHC with three valves per cylinder
Bore 82 mm and stroke 63 mm
Compression ratio 9.0:1
Power output 180bhp @ 6000 rpm
Induction system by No 2 IHI turbochargers
with single 42DCNVH Weber carburettor
(later models with fuel-injection)



The first engine designed and built under the ownership of Alejandro De Tomaso. The Biturbo was created to compete with the successful BMW 3 series range and represented excellent value with its elegant looks and high specification. The engine, despite the same V6 configuration as the C114, was of a completely new design. Designed as a 2-litre to avoid the penal Italian 'Value Added Tax', 36% for cars over 2000 cc, it was later produced as a 2.5 litre and a 2.8 litre for the export market.
For the home market there was a sportier engine, introduced in 1983, for the 'S' models and in 1986 the engine was eqipped with a fuel injection system in the 'Si' models.
This twin overhead camshaft, three valves (2 intake and 1 exhaust) per cylinder and twin IHI turbocharged (later water-cooled) engine powered the more Maseratis than any other models in their history with well over 30,000 sold.

It was updated in the persuing years as:

AM 452.10 - 1983 Biturbo S ..................... 1996.2 cc - 205bhp @ 6500 rpm
AM 453 - 1984 Biturbo 425 .................. 2490.9 cc - 200bhp @ 5500 rpm
AM 473 - 1984 228 ............................. 2789.8 cc - 255bhp @ 6000 rpm
AM 470 - 1985 Biturbo i ...................... 1996.2 cc - 188bhp @ 6000 rpm
AM 471 - 1986 Biturbo Si .................... 1996.2 cc - 220bhp @ 6350 rpm




ENGINE 'Hi Tech' 6:36

Production run: 1985
V6-cyl @ 90° 1996.2 cc engine
4OHC with six valves per cylinder
Bore 82 mm and stroke 63 mm
Compression ratio not known
Power output 261bhp @ 7200 rpm
Induction system by No 2 IHI turbochargers
with single 42DCNVH Weber carburettor.



In 1985 Maserati announced this prototype V6 engine with four overhead camshafts and an amazing six valves per cylinder. It remained a prototype! The six valve per cylinder head is still on display in the factory today!




ENGINE V6 4AC 24v

Production run: 1988-1998
V6-cyl @ 90° 1996.2 cc engine
4OHC with four valves per cylinder
Bore 82 mm and stroke 63 mm
Compression ratio 7.6:1
Power output 245bhp @ 6250 rpm
Induction system by No 2 IHI turbochargers
with Weber Marelli fuel injection system.





In 1988 the 'Biturbo' engine was nearing its final evolution with the addition of new cylinder heads equipped with four valves per cylinder. New turbochargers and the Marelli Weber fuel injection system brought a new level of smoothness and reliability and power output was increased to 245bhp.
In 1990 a special edition 'Racing' was introduced with power now increased to 282bhp. 1991 saw the arrival of a new Maserati race car, the 'Barchetta' with its engine developing 315bhp.
In 1992 Maserati presented the new Ghibli with power raised to 306bhp - at its launch the largest power output per litre of any production car in the world. Export models were equipped with a 2.8-litre engine producing 286bhp.
In 1995 the introduction of the 'Ghibli Cup' with redesigned heads and new roller-bearing turbochargers saw power rise even further to an astonishing 330bhp - at that time, the largest power output per litre of any production car in the world.




It was updated in the persuing years as:

AM 490 - 1990 Racing ..................... 1996.2 cc - 285bhp @ 6500 rpm

AM 501 - 1991 Barchetta ................. 1996.2 cc - 315bhp @ 6250 rpm

AM 496 - 1992 Ghibli II .................... 1996.2 cc - 306bhp @ 6250 rpm

AM 574 - 1993 Ghibli II .................... 2789.8 cc - 284bhp @ 6000 rpm

AM 577 - 1995 Ghibli Cup ................ 1996.2 cc - 330bhp @ 7000 rpm






ENGINE AM 479

Production run: 1988-1995
V8-cyl @ 90° 3217 cc engine
4OHC with four valves per cylinder
Bore 80 mm and stroke 80 mm
Compression ratio 7.5:1
Power output 326bhp @ 6000 rpm
Induction system by No 2 IHI turbochargers
and Weber Marelli electronic injection/ignition system.








ENGINE AM 585

Production run: 1998-2001
V8-cyl @ 90° 3217 cc engine
4OHC with four valves per cylinder
Bore 80 mm and stroke 80 mm
Compression ratio 8.0:1
Power output 370bhp @ 6250 rpm
Induction system by No 2 IHI turbochargers
and Weber Magneti Marelli 4CM electronic injection/ignition system..




In 1989 Maserati re-entered the supercar category with the launch of the 'Shamal'. This 'Beast' utilised a new twin-turbo V8 3.2-litre engine producing some 326bhp. In 1990 this engine was chosen for the 'Chubasco' prototype but alas it never reached the production stage. 1995 saw a famous old combination revived with the arrival of the new V8 Quattroporte IV. In 1998 a new era dawned for the 'Casa del Tridente' and under Ferrari ownership the 3200 GT and the Quattroporte 'Evoluzione' were launched with power now up to 370bhp and 335bhp respectively.




ENGINE M138

Production run: 2001-Present
V8-cyl @ 90° 4244 cc engine
4OHC with four valves per cylinder
Bore 92 mm and stroke 79.8 mm
Compression ratio 11.0:1
Power output 390/400bhp @ 7000 rpm
Induction system by Integrated Bosch Motronic
ME7.3.2 ignition - fuel injection system.








ENGINE MC 12

Production run: 2004-Today
V12-cyl @ 65° 5998 cc engine
4OHC with four valves per cylinder
Bore 92 mm and stroke 75.2 mm
Compression ratio 11.2:1
Power output 630-760bhp @ 7500-8000 rpm
Distribution is by way of twin gear-driven overhead camshafts per cylinder bank, with four valves per cylinder hydraulic tappets.
Integrated Bosch injection-ignition system, drive-by-wire electronic accelerator.




In 2004 Maserati introduced the MC12, a two-seater long-tail coupé-spyder, powered by an impressive 630 hhp six-litre mid-rear mounted V12 engine.

In 2006 they launched the MC12 Versione Corse, developed from the MC12 GT1 that won the 2005 and 2007 FIA GT Manufacturers' Cup.